Home > Uncategorized > kiss, germs and saving babies

kiss, germs and saving babies

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6471483/Kissing-was-developed-to-spread-germs.html

Hello, how are you?

This article is about the research on kissing. the scientists have figure out that kissing is an act of spreading germs from one person to another. And the result of  kissing is pretty phenomenal.  This doctor from University of Leeds said that the purpose of kissing is to trade saliva, and to build up immunity. it is also the part of  protecting pregnant women and its babies from diseases.

I would like to believe that most of our social actions such as handshakes and kisses and hug have a scientific explanation why we do them.  There are decent amount of psychological explanations in out social behaviors, and we all know Mr. Floyd. This is probably the first time I have read that explains our social behavior by biological explanation.

Do you think we some how knew that kissing prevents infection to the baby like by an instinct?

What other social behaviors that you guys can think of which are more like biology than psychology?

 

If you are germ-phobic I am so sorry, but  I still encourage everyone to kiss their friends, family and  their loved ones.

 

 

 

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. DM
    February 27, 2012 at 2:23 am

    I definitely believe that kissing is more instinctual in humans than we may notice. And a lot of stuff like that is too. I’ve been taught by multiple teachers that humans instinctually gravitate towards more attractive sexual partners, not solely based on looks, but because we correlate attractiveness with better reproductive health. It’s the instinct of humans to look for a healthy mating partner, and more attractive people tend to look healthier apparently!

  2. Leila Mafoud
    February 27, 2012 at 2:39 am

    I have actually found myself wondering before how kissing evolved, why we do it, and if it’s a learned habit or natural instinct. It’s fascinating to ponder if nature deliberately makes things feel pleasurable so that they can fulfill a necessary function. If this research is true it prompts us to ask the question: why do we only want to exchange saliva with people who we are attracted to or love. Wouldn’t it make more sense to do so with those who we perceive as having better immune systems? What is the link between liking someone and building immunity to germs?

  3. lexicory
    February 27, 2012 at 3:06 am

    Any type of other human contact such as shaking hands, hugging, or kissing is good for our immune systems. It’s also a great sign of affection. Germs are all around us in everyday life, and the more and more often that we come into contact with them is better for our lives and our health. That’s one reason that some parents contact their kids with chicken pox as earlier as possible, to build a quick resistance to this outbreak and to get them through it before it becomes too harmful to them when they are older. Instinct is something we are typically born with, and perhaps social norms have evolved to these points of building our immune systems.

  4. zmackay
    February 27, 2012 at 6:24 am

    Although I am a germaphobe and slightly disturbed by this article, I think that you bring up some really interesting societal implications. It is particularly interesting when considering the geographical variety of greetings and interactions that have evolved- whereas we shake hands and kiss those that we love, the Mende people in Sierra Leone have a custom in which they rub the chins of welcome visitors by way of greeting. How did these different customs evolve? Was it through a process of natural selection in which those who exchanged enough saliva or germs with others to build up the strongest immunity had the best rate of survival? In that case, why is it that in different parts of the world, different methods of transfer, of exposure, evolved? Was it a simple matter of pleasure and therefore preference or was it influenced by societal standards or even climate? It would certainly be interesting to pursue some of the many avenues this topic opens up. Yet there are two sides to the biological implication of these exchanges. While building up immunity is certainly an advantage, exposure can put a person’s health at risk. I believe it is for this reason that many societies have developed negative connotations and standards to regulate the interactions between individuals.

  5. leimaf
    April 23, 2012 at 3:52 am

    I have actually found myself wondering before how kissing evolved, why we do it, and if it’s a learned habit or natural instinct. It’s fascinating to ponder if nature deliberately makes things feel pleasurable so that they can fulfill a necessary function. If this research is true it prompts us to ask the question: why do we only want to exchange saliva with people who we are attracted to or love. Wouldn’t it make more sense to do so with those who we perceive as having better immune systems? What is the link between liking someone and building immunity to germs?

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